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Private Adoption and COVID-19

Mother and baby wearing protective masks

In only a few short weeks, the COVID-19 virus has changed the way Americans live. Commerce has ceased in most cities, people have stopped socializing, celebrating, traveling, and interacting with those outside of their households. The pandemic has confused and frightened many people. But some individuals are more vulnerable to its effects than others. If you are pregnant and considering adoption for your child, the onset of the crisis may have you in a state of panic and uncertainty.

Gulf Coast Adoptions Is Still Here for You

Adoption is considered an essential service, and Florida adoption attorneys and Florida adoption agencies remain open to help expectant mothers who want to place their child for adoption. Gulf Coast Adoptions remains open 24 hours a day and 7 days a week for expectant mothers considering adoption and birth mother support including post-placement assistance. We are available 24/7 by phone, text, chat, Facetime, and email.

Adoption is not something to take lightly as the decision is permanent. You should not consider adoption solely due to concerns over COVID-19. It may seem like the only solution given the economic havoc caused by the virus, but there are resources available that may be able to assist you during these trying times. Please contact us for a list of charities that may be able to assist you during this hardship.

Gulf Coast Adoptions is dedicated to the care and welfare of expectant mothers, birth mothers, and potential adoptive parents. We vow to continue our birthmother support services throughout the Coronavirus crisis. Here are some of the services that we will continue to offer our expectant mothers considering adoption:

  1. Will support services from adoptive families be affected?
    No. You will continue to receive support. If the adoptive parents have agreed to pay reasonable living expenses of the birth mother, then this should continue. Reasonable expenses include rent, utilities, basic telephone and Internet service, food, clothing, transportation, insurance, and other expenses necessary to maintain your health and the health of your baby. The potential adoptive parents of your child should also pay the necessary medical expenses, legal and court costs, and the fees of other professionals seen by the birth mother.

  2. Can I continue with the adoption plan I already have for my child?
    Yes. If you have already been matched with the prospective adoptive parent(s), the adoption plan will continue regardless of the COVID-19 virus.

  3. How can I stay in touch with the adoptive parent during the COVID-19 crisis?
    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has advised against physical person-to-person contact of any kind. You put yourself and your baby at risk by being in the same room with other people and breathing the same air. During this time, it is best to communicate with the adoptive parents on Facetime, Skype, or Zoom. You can also call and send text messages.

  4. How do I keep myself and my baby healthy during this crisis?
    You should practice social distancing in your daily life. It is not known whether pregnant women have a greater chance of getting sick from COVID-19. Pregnant women experience changes to their bodies that may increase the risk of some infections. That is why you should take all precautions, including:
    – Covering your mouth when you cough
    – Avoiding people who are sick
    – Clean your hands often using soap and water or alcohol-based sanitizer

  5. What about post-placement assistance?
    If you are scheduled to deliver in the coming weeks or you have recently given birth and placed your child for adoption, post-placement assistance is available. Gulf Coast Adoptions will continue to work with birthmothers. This includes mental and health care treatment. You will continue to receive financial assistance for six weeks post-placement.

What are some of the other changes I may see owing to COVID-19?

The virus has called for measures that are inconvenient for all parties concerned but are necessary for the safety and well-being of all. Adoptive parents may not be permitted in the hospital room for the birth or as you recover. Some hospitals have implemented, only one person allowed for the entirety of your hospitalization. You will need to decide who that will be. These will be hospital policies and will not be something that we will be able to negotiate.

ICPC (Interstate Compact on the Placement of Children), which allows for the interstate transport of a child in a foster care or adoption situation, may take longer to process. If the adoptive parent lives out of state, it may take them longer to take the baby to their home state. There may also be legal delays due to the closure of courts or delays in scheduling.

As you go through the adoption process, Gulf Coast Adoptions will continue to be there for you. Please contact us with any questions.

Contact Info:

Gulf Coast Adoptions 850-999-7977 clay@gulfcoastadoptions.com
223 W. Gregory Street, Suite A
Pensacola, FL 32502
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